Cold Hardy Fruit Trees

Most of us don’t live in a tropical area, so what types of fruit trees can we grow? First, find out what agricultural zone you’re living in. These zones are determined by your region’s temperatures. Visit the USDA interactive plant hardiness zone map to find your zone.

Here are some suggestions for fruit trees that can survive in colder temperatures.

Everbearing Strawberry: Zones 4-9

The everbearing strawberry is very popular because of its ability to produce strawberries well after spring ends. It grows to about one foot in height and can be 1-2 feet wide. It requires full to partial sunlight. It is adaptable to different types of soil and has a good chance of surviving a drought.

Granny Smith Apple: Zones 5-8

Granny Smith apples are fairly easy to grow and they produce fruit very quickly. They ripen in early November, and stay fresh through winter and spring. They grow to 10-15 feet high and 8-10 feet wide. They require full to partial sunlight and are adaptable to different soil conditions. Overall, most apple trees can survive in zones 4 or 5-8.

MacIntosh Apple: Zones 4-8

Ripening early in the season, Macintosh trees are popular because they produce a large amount of fruit. If planted near your Granny Smith trees, the two types of apple trees will help pollinate each other. These trees can grow 15-20 feet tall and 10-12 feet wide. They do well in full to partial sunlight and are very adaptable to different soil conditions. Overall, most apple trees can survive in zones 4 or 5-8.

Thornless Blackberry: Zones 5-9

Blackberries produce large amounts of berries. The berries grow in large clusters and can be eaten right off the bush or picked and used in jams or jellies. Blackberries are rich in anti-oxidants which have many health benefits. These plants will grow 3-6 feet tall. They grow 3-5 feet wide and are often planted in groups of three. They do well in full to partial sun.

Cleveland Flowering Pear Tree: Zones 5-8

These trees naturally grow in a tight, semi-perfect oval. In spring white flowers bloom over the surface area of the tree. This tree can resist damage from extreme ice, snow, and wind. It grows quickly up to 30-40 feet tall and 15-20 feet wide. They survive in full to partial sunlight.

Red Haven Peach Tree: Zones 5-9

These trees are normally planted in pairs to help with pollination. This allows your trees to produce more fruit. Red Haven Peaches ripen in June. They grow quickly to 15 feet tall and 10 feet wide. They survive in full to partial sun and are adaptable to different soil conditions.

Bing Cherries: Zones 4-8

Bing Cherries are a deep red and the most popular dark cherry. These trees grow quickly and fruit faster than most other cherry trees. Bing Cherry trees grow up to 20 feet tall and 10-15 feet wide. Full to partial sunlight is ideal and they are very adaptable to different soil conditions.

Image courtesy of dan at freedigitalphotos.net

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