Medicinal Moringa

The Moringa Tree is a fast growing tree that yields seed pods and a feathery canopy of leaves.

The tree grows best in tropical areas. Leaves are produced even during the dry season and in times of drought. All parts of the tree are edible, however the root and root extracts may have toxic substances that if consumed could result in paralysis and fatality. The leaves are used fresh or dried and ground into a powder. The seed pods are picked while they’re still green and can be eaten fresh or cooked. The seed oil is sweet, doesn’t stick or dry, and doesn’t go rancid. The seeds are eaten green, roasted, powdered, and steeped for tea or used I curries.

The moringa has a wide array of health benefits. It is a god source of protein, vitamins, amino acids, fiber, and iron. It can act as a cardiac and circulatory stimulant. It can lower cholesterol and is a natural diuretic. It has antitumor, antiepileptic, anti-inflammatory, antiulcer, antioxidant, antispasmodic, antihypertensive, antibacterial, and antifungal properties. It can also reduce fevers and protect your liver.

More simply, here is a list of some of the common conditions it can help treat:

Anemia

Arthritis

Asthma

Athlete’s foot

Cancer

Constipation

Dandruff

Diabetes

Diarrhea

Epilepsy

Gastritis

Gingivitis

Heart conditions

Headaches

High blood pressure

Infections

Inflammation

Intestinal ulcers

Kidney stones

Low breast milk production

Sex drive

Snake bites

Stimulate immunity

Stomach ulcers

Thyroid disorders

Warts

The anti-inflammatory effects can also influence resultant conditions like asthma and pain. The Moringa plant alkaloid resembles ephedrine and can be used in the treatment of asthma. It relaxes the bronchioles. Also, the seed kernels show promise in treating bronchial asthma. The effects of the Moringa plant on asthma are still being studied.

The leaves of the plant are used to treat headaches. They are rubbed against the temple to reduce pain. They can also stop the bleeding from a shallow cut. The antibacterial and anti-inflammatory properties can treat small cuts and insect bites. Leaf tea can treat gastric ulcers and diarrhea. It’s high iron content improves anemia. Also, it can reduce fevers, bronchitis, eye and ear infections, and inflammation of the mucus membranes.

Eating the actual fruit treats malnutrition and diarrhea. If eaten raw, the fruit can act as a de-wormer. It can treat liver and spleen problems as well as joint pain.

The seeds of the tree can treat arthritis, rheumatism, gout, cramps, STDs, and boils. They are used as a relaxant for epilepsy. They have also been effective against skin infecting bacteria Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The ethanol and ethyl acetate extracts from the seeds may decrease fever also.

Finally, there is one thing to watch out for regarding the moringa fruit. At one time moringa root was used as a permanent form of birth control. It prevents the fertilized egg from being able to attach to the lining of the uterine wall. Over time it can decrease fertility. If consumed while pregnant, it can cause fetal resorption or induce contractions leading to miscarriage. Therefore, it is recommended to stay away from moringa in general if pregnant.

However, moringa leaf can help breastfeeding mothers produce milk. (Remember it is the root and root bark that have antifertility effects). Moringa leaf is safe.

But root bark does have a redeeming quality. Actually, a very redeeming quality. It may help fight against post-menopausal epithelial ovarian cancer. After menopause, when fertility is no longer a concern, root bark is safe, and may fight cancer. So as long as one stays away from it during their childbearing years, go for it later in life!

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